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What's New in Science - More news
  • Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar fungus gold rush
    Overwhelmed by speculators trying to cash-in on a prized medicinal fungus known as Himalayan Viagra, two isolated Tibetan communities have managed to do at the local level what world leaders often fail to do on a global scale -- implement a successful system for the sustainable harvest of a precious...
  • New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies:...
    A common complication, gestational diabetes affects approximately 6-7% of pregnant women. Currently, screening is done in two steps to help identify patients most at risk; however, the suggested levels for additional testing were based on singleton pregnancy data. Now investigators have analyzed dat...
  • They know the drill: Leading the league in boring through ice sheets
    Hollow coring drills are used to extract ice cores that can analyze the past atmosphere. Scientists have now documented carbon dioxide in the atmosphere between 23,000 and 9,000 years ago, based on data from an 11,000-foot hole in Antarctica.
  • Take a walk in the sun to ease time change woes, sleep expert says
    Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 2. As clocks turn back one hour, we gain an hour of sleep but often still feel groggy and sluggish. A sleep expert says this change in sleep schedule is exacerbated by our tendency to alter our sleep patterns on the weekends anyway.
  • Lord of the microrings
    Researchers report a significant breakthrough in laser technology with the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand. This advance holds ramifications for a wide range of optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data stora...
  • Heart's own immune cells can help it heal
    The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research. In a mouse model of heart failure, the researchers showed that blocking the bone marrow's macrophages from entering the heart protects the organ's beneficial pool of macrophages, allowing...
  • Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalence in U.S. revealed by study
    Nearly 5 percent of U.S. children may be affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), according to a new study. FASD are a group of conditions that can occur in the children of mothers who drank alcohol during pregnancy. Characteristics are both physical and cognitive and can include abnorma...
  • Biology meets geometry: Geometry of a common cellular structure explored
    Architecture imitates life, at least when it comes to those spiral ramps in multistory parking garages. Stacked and connecting parallel levels, the ramps are replications of helical structures found in a ubiquitous membrane structure in the cells of the body.
  • Harnessing error-prone chips
    As transistors get smaller, they also grow less reliable. Increasing their operating voltage can help, but that means a corresponding increase in power consumption. With information technology consuming a steadily growing fraction of the world's energy supplies, some researchers and hardware manufac...
  • Bats will hang out with their friends this Halloween
    New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same social groups of 'friends.' The study found that different social groups roost in separate, though adjacent, parts of woodland. The findings have important implications for conservation.
  • Oceans arrived early to Earth; Primitive meteorites were a likely source of w...
    Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: Where did Earth's water come fro...
  • Hygienic funerals, better protection for health workers offer best chance to ...
    Hygienic funeral practices, case isolation, contact tracing with quarantines, and better protection for health care workers are the keys to stopping the Ebola epidemic that continues to expand in West Africa, researchers said in a new report. They said broad implementation of aggressive measures the...
  • Science casts light on sex in the orchard
    Persimmons are among the small club of plants with separate sexes -- individual trees are either male or female. Now scientists have discovered how sex is determined in a species of persimmon, potentially opening up new possibilities in plant breeding.
  • Genetic factors behind surviving or dying from Ebola shown in mouse study
    A newly developed mouse model suggests that genetic factors are behind the mild-to-deadly range of responses to the Ebola virus. The frequency of different manifestations of the disease across the lines of these mice are similar in variety and proportion to the spectrum of clinical disease observed ...
  • Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders
    A fungal disease from Asia wiped out salamanders in parts of Europe and will likely reach the US through the international wildlife trade in Asian newts sold as pets, say US experts. Scientists report the fungus arose in Asia 30 million years ago and is lethal to many European and American newt spec...
  • Magma pancakes beneath Indonesia's Lake Toba: Subsurface sources of mega-erup...
    The tremendous amounts of lava that are emitted during super-eruptions accumulate over millions of years prior to the event in the Earth's crust. These reservoirs consist of magma that intrudes into the crust in the form of numerous horizontally oriented sheets resting on top of each other like a pi...
  • High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine
    Researchers have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine?s significant obstacles.
  • What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom's socioeconomic background
    Dietary patterns of babies vary according to the racial, ethnic and educational backgrounds of their mothers, pediatrics researchers have found. For example, babies whose diet included more breastfeeding and solid foods that adhere to infant guidelines from international and pediatric organizations ...
  • Making lab-grown tissues stronger
    Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. Cartilage, for example, is a hard material that caps the ends of bones and allows joints to work smoothly. Biomedical engineers are exploring ways to to...
  • Young adults ages 18 to 26 should be viewed as separate subpopulation in poli...
    Young adults ages 18-26 should be viewed as a separate subpopulation in policy and research, because they are in a critical period of development when successes or failures could strongly affect the trajectories of their lives, says a new report.
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