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What's New in Science - More news
  • An apple a day could keep obesity away
    Nondigestible compounds in apples -- specifically, Granny Smith apples -- may help prevent disorders associated with obesity, scientists have concluded. "We know that, in general, apples are a good source of these nondigestible compounds but there are differences in varieties," said the study's lead...
  • Brief depression questionnaires could lead to unnecessary antidepressant pres...
    Short questionnaires used to identify patients at risk for depression are linked with antidepressant medications being prescribed when they may not be needed, according to new research. Known as "brief depression symptom measures," the self-administered questionnaires are used in primary care settin...
  • Higher nurse-to-patient standard improves staff safety, study shows
    A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals significantly lowered job-related injuries and illnesses for both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, according to research.
  • 'Deadly diarrhea' rates nearly doubled in 10 years: Study
    Infections with the intestinal superbug C. difficile nearly doubled from 2001 to 2010 in US hospitals without noticeable improvement in patient mortality rates or hospital lengths of stay, according to a study of 2.2 million C. difficile infection cases.
  • New transparent nanoscintillators for radiation detection developed
    Tadiation detection properties have been identified in a light-emitting nanostructure made in a new way from two of the least expensive rare earth elements. The new material is made from two of the least expensive rare earth elements, so it is cost-effective, estimated at a little over $7 per cm3.
  • Childhood asthma linked to lack of ventilation for gas stoves
    Parents with children at home should use ventilation when cooking with a gas stove, researchers are recommending, after a new study showed an association between gas kitchen stove ventilation and asthma, asthma symptoms and chronic bronchitis.
  • Adding uncertainty to improve mathematical models
    Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that b...
  • Chefs at schools can increase school meal participation, vegetable intake amo...
    Gourmet pizza in school? According to a new pilot study, chef-made meals can increase participation in the National School Lunch Program by 9 percent and overall selection and consumption of vegetables by 16 percent.
  • Self-compassion key to positive body image, coping
    Women who accept and tolerate their imperfections appear to have a more positive body image despite their body mass index and are better able to handle personal disappointments and setbacks in their daily lives. Research has found that this self-compassion might be an important means to increase pos...
  • Software for automated sorting of genomes of individual microbial species thr...
    Microbes -- the single-celled organisms that dominate every ecosystem on Earth -- have an amazing ability to feed on plant biomass and convert it into other chemical products. Tapping into this talent has the potential to revolutionize energy, medicine, environmental remediation and many other field...
  • At the interface of math and science: Using mathematics to advance problems i...
    In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas -- often behind the scenes.
  • Sweat-eating bacteria may improve skin health
    Bacteria that metabolize ammonia, a major component of sweat, may improve skin health and some day could be used for the treatment of skin disorders, such as acne or chronic wounds. Human volunteers using the bacteria reported better skin condition and appearance compared with a placebo control grou...
  • Healthy fats help diseased heart muscle process, use fuel
    Oleate, a common dietary fat found in olive oil, restored proper metabolism of fuel in an animal model of heart failure, researchers report. Heart failure affects nearly 5 million Americans, and more than half a million new cases are diagnosed each year. Heart failure is not the same as having a hea...
  • Plants prepackage beneficial microbes in their seeds
    Plants have a symbiotic relationship with certain bacteria. These 'commensal' bacteria help the plants extract nutrients and defend against invaders -- an important step in preventing pathogens from contaminating fruits and vegetables. Now, scientists have discovered that plants may package their co...
  • 'Frenemy' in Parkinson's disease takes to crowdsourcing
    A key neuronal protein called alpha-synuclein normally gathers in synapses, where aggregates of it help regulate neurotransmissions, researchers have found. In overabundance, though, a-synuclein can choke off communication altogether, leading to neuronal death and related diseases.
  • Single-neuron 'hub' orchestrates activity of an entire brain circuit
    New research makes a major contribution to efforts to navigate the brain, offering a precise model of the organization of developing neuronal circuits. If researchers can further identify the cellular type of 'hub neurons,' it may be possible to reproduce them in vitro and transplant them into aged ...
  • Genetic modifier affects colon tumor formation
    The adenomatous polyposis coli protein, which protects against colon cancer, has been the focus of recent study. Many experiments involve testing mice with APC mutations, which cause colon cancer, and seeing if any new drug compounds will work against the mutations.
  • Nitrogen fingerprint in biomolecules could be from early sun
    The pattern of nitrogen in biomolecules like proteins, which differ greatly from that seen in other parts of the solar system, could have been generated by the interactions of light from the early sun with nitrogen gas in the nebula, long before Earth formed.
  • Glaciers in the Grand Canyon of Mars?
    For decades, planetary geologists have speculated that glaciers might once have crept through Valles Marineris, the 2000-mile-long chasm that constitutes the Grand Canyon of Mars. Using satellite images, researchers have identified features that might have been carved by past glaciers as they flowed...
  • Sleep twitches light up the brain
    A new study finds twitches during rapid eye movement sleep comprise a different class of movement, which researchers say is further evidence that sleep twitches activate circuits throughout the developing brain and teach newborns about their limbs and what they can do with them.
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