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  • Endangered species success: Idaho salmon regaining fitness advantage
    Once on the brink of extinction with only a few fish remaining, Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness they need to rebuild wild populations. A new analysis shows that naturally spawned offspring of fish saved by a hatchery program are now surviving to return at increasing rate -- high...
  • 'Scary' centipede's genes reveal how life evolved on our planet
    Centipedes, those many-legged creatures that startle us in our homes and gardens, have been genetically sequenced for the first time. An international team of over 100 scientists today reveals how this humble arthropod?s DNA gave them new insight into how life developed on our planet. 
  • Physicists bind single-atom sheets with the same force geckos use to climb walls
    The approach is to design synergistic materials by combining two single-atom thick sheets, for example, that act as a photovoltaic cell as well as a light-emitting diode, converting energy between electricity and radiation.
  • Long-term testosterone therapy does not increase risk of prostate cancer
    Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. In a new study, inve...
  • Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria
    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infe...
  • Physicists predict fano resonance in lead-free relaxors: Discovery advances k...
    Scientists predicts that a phenomenon known in physics as Fano resonance can exist in materials that are used in electronic devices. The discovery advances the fundamental understanding of ferroelectric relaxors, which were discovered in the early 1960s but whose properties are still poorly understo...
  • Mining can damage fish habitats far downstream, study shows
    Anglers across the nation wondering why luck at their favorite fishing spot seems to have dried up may have a surprising culprit: a mine miles away, even in a different state. Scientists have taken a first broad look at the impacts of mines across the country and found that mining can damage fish ha...
  • Athletes' testosterone surges not tied to winning, study finds
    A higher surge of testosterone in competition, the so-called 'winner effect,' is not actually related to winning, suggests a new study of intercollegiate cross country runners.
  • Pathology specialist contributes to debate on breast cancer gene screening
    What are the risks and benefits of screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the general adult population? An expert has published an invited commentary on this issue.
  • E-health records used to search for hidden drug benefits
    With research and development costs for many drugs reaching well into the billions, pharmaceutical companies want more than ever to determine whether their drugs already at market have any hidden therapeutic benefits that could warrant putting additional indications on the label and increase product...
  • Superbug in SE Michigan shows recent decline
    A new study finds a decrease in an emergent strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that is resistant to last line defense antibiotics. Researchers examined the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) infections in southeastern Michigan, where the majority of these i...
  • Trojan horse tactic gives parasites edge over immune systems
    Parasites use Trojan horse subterfuge to suppress the immunity of their victims when causing infection, according to a study. Scientists have shown that parasites are able to secrete tiny sealed packages of genetic material into the cells of their victims, in order to suppress the immune response to...
  • Blu-ray disc can be used to improve solar cell performance
    Who knew about Blu-ray discs? One of the best ways to store high-definition movies and television shows because of their high-density data storage, Blu-ray discs also improve the performance of solar cells, according to a new study. Researchers have discovered that the pattern of information written...
  • Vultures evolved an extreme gut to cope with disgusting dietary habits
    How is it that vultures can live on a diet of carrion that would at least lead to severe food-poisoning, and more likely kill most other animals?
  • Patients at emergency departments regarded as 'symptoms,' researcher says
    The healthcare work of providing care at Emergency departments is medicalized and result-driven. As a consequence of this, patients are regarded as ?symptoms?, and are shunted around the department as ?production units?, new research suggests.
  • A 'hybrid vehicle' that delivers DNA
    A new hybrid vehicle is under development. Its performance isn?t measured by the distance it travels, but rather the delivery of its cargo: vaccines that contain genetically engineered DNA to fight HIV, cancer, influenza and other maladies. The technology is a biomedical advancement that could help ...
  • Pain and itch in a dish: Scientists convert human skin cells into sensory neu...
    Scientists have found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative...
  • Incomes fall as stressed economy struggles
    Australian average incomes are falling with the country's population growth 'masking underlying economic weakness', according to an economist.
  • Feeling -- not being -- wealthy drives opposition to wealth redistribution
    People's views on income inequality and wealth distribution may have little to do with how much money they have in the bank and a lot to do with how wealthy they feel in comparison to their friends and neighbors, according to new findings.
  • Study maps how city neighborhoods affect diabetes risk
    Public health researchers in Philadelphia looked at how neighborhood and community-level factors -- not just individual factors like diet, exercise and education -- influence people's diabetes risk. Their new study adds insight into the role of the physical and social environment on diabetes risk, z...
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