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What's New in Science - More news
  • Titan glowing at dusk and dawn
    New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.
  • Finally: Missing link between vitamin D, prostate cancer
    A new study offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
  • Real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside body
    Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are respon...
  • Paralyzed patients have weaker bones, higher risk of fractures than expected
    People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapi...
  • Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
    A nano-sized discovery helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness, researchers report.
  • New ultra-thin 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency
    Researchers have devised an ultra-thin LCD screen that operates without a power source, making it a compact, energy-efficient way to display visual information. The technology may one day have applications in products such as e-book readers, flexible displays or as a security measure on credit cards...
  • Hospital logs staggering 2.5 million alarms in just a month
    Following the study of a hospital that logged more than 2.5 million patient monitoring alarms in just one month, researchers have, for the first time, comprehensively defined the detailed causes as well as potential solutions for the widespread issue of alarm fatigue in hospitals.
  • Wild chimps use innovative strategies to raid neighboring agricultural fields...
    Wild chimpanzees living in a disturbed habitat may use innovative strategies, like foraging crops at night, to coexist with nearby human activities.
  • Rescued 'abandoned' penguin chicks survival similar to colony rates
    Abandoned penguin chicks that were hand-reared and returned to the wild showed a similar survival rate to their naturally-reared counterparts.
  • Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) level...
    BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. Subjects studied showed a rapid increase of BPA in their blood after using a skin care product and then touching a store receipt with BPA.
  • Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
    A new study provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
  • Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice
    A new drug, OTS964, can eradicate aggressive human lung cancers transplanted into mice, scientists report. It inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types but is rarely expressed in healthy adult tissues. Without it, cancer cells fail to complete the cell-division pro...
  • Fast modeling of cancer mutations
    A new genome-editing technique enables rapid analysis of genes mutated in tumors, researchers report. Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actua...
  • As permafrost soils thaw soil microbes amplify global climate change
    Scientists have discovered how an invisible menagerie of microbes in permafrost soils acts as global drivers of Earth processes such as climate via gas exchange between soils and the atmosphere. These findings will help climate modelers more accurately predict Earth's future climate.
  • How lymph nodes expand during disease
    The same specialized immune cells that patrol the body and spot infections also trigger the expansion of immune organs called lymph nodes, scientists have discovered. The immune system defends the body from infections and can also spot and destroy cancer cells. Lymph nodes are at the heart of this r...
  • Two families of comets found around nearby star: Biggest census ever of exoco...
    The HARPS instrument at ESO?s La Silla Observatory in Chile has been used to make the most complete census of comets around another star ever created. Astronomers have studied nearly 500 individual comets orbiting the star Beta Pictoris and has discovered that they belong to two distinct families of...
  • Some scientists share better than others
    Some scientists share better than others. While astronomers and geneticists embrace the concept, the culture of ecology still has a ways to go. New research explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built...
  • Bariatric surgery success influenced by how people view their own weight
    Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research. The study is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight bias in relation to post-surgical weight loss su...
  • Karakoram glacier anomaly resolved, a cold case of climate science
    Researchers may have hit upon an answer to a climate-change puzzle that has eluded scientists for years, namely why glaciers in the Karakoram range of the Himalayas have remained stable and even increased in mass while glaciers nearby and worldwide have been receding. Understanding the 'Karakoram an...
  • Shifting precipitation patterns affect tea flavor, health compounds, study shows
    Major antioxidant compounds that determine tea health properties and taste fell up to 50 percent during an extreme monsoon, a study concludes. The findings are based on samples taken from tea gardens in southwest China. The researchers collected samples from two extreme weather events -- an extreme ...
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